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'Strangers on their own land’: ideology, policy and rational landscapes in the United States, 1825-1934.

Winlow, H (2013) ''Strangers on their own land’: ideology, policy and rational landscapes in the United States, 1825-1934.' Cartographica, 48 (1). pp. 47-66. ISSN 0317-7173

Abstract

During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Native Americans were increasingly excluded from the American social body and from national space. This article explores that exclusion from three perspectives: through dominant national ideologies that represented tribal groups as “Other” and inferior to European Americans; through federal policies – including removal, reservation, and allotment – that increasingly confined “Indians” to specific parts of the national landscape; and through the cartographic delineation of the national territory, which produced a Cartesian gridded landscape alien to Native understandings of land. This latter focus includes a case study of Indian Territory, which was incorporated into the state of Oklahoma in 1907. These three strands are explored through a theoretical framework that combines ideas about governmentality and territory, discourses of otherness and exclusion, and the power of maps.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

Paper of the same title delivered as part of the Oxford Seminars on Cartography series at the Oxford University Centre for the Environment on 8 May 2014

Keywords: allotment, cartography, dispossession, exclusion, governmentality, Indian reservations, Native Americans, Public Land Survey, removal, territory
Divisions: College of Liberal Arts
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2013 09:42
Last Modified: 29 Apr 2016 14:11
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