Social movements, historical absence, and the problematisation of self-harm in the UK, 1980-2000

Cresswell, M and Brock, T (2017) 'Social movements, historical absence, and the problematisation of self-harm in the UK, 1980-2000.' Journal of Critical Realism, 16 (1). pp. 7-25. ISSN 1476-7430

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/14767430.2016.1221729

Abstract

This article engages Bhaskar's category of absence and Foucault's notion of problematization in the context of explaining an example of the historical emergence of political activism. Specifically, it considers the emergence of the ‘psychiatric survivors’ social movement in the UK, with a focus on the ‘politics of self-harm’. The politics of self-harm refers to acts of self-injurious behaviour, such as drug over-dosage or self-laceration, which do not result in death and which bring individuals to the attention of psychiatric services. For many years survivors have protested about the harmful treatment (‘iatrogenesis’) they receive from such services and have campaigned for their reform and for new, non-psychiatric understandings of the meaning of self-harm. The article explains how such activism emerged in the late 1980s. Its contribution is at the interface of critical realism and social movement studies.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: absence, problematization, psychiatric survivors, self-harm, social movements
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
D History General and Old World > DA Great Britain
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: College of Liberal Arts
Date Deposited: 17 Apr 2019 14:42
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2019 14:42
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