The impact of a modified initial teacher education on challenging trainees’ understanding of neuromyths

McMahon, K, Yeh, C.S.-H and Etchells, P.J (2019) 'The impact of a modified initial teacher education on challenging trainees’ understanding of neuromyths.' Mind, Brain and Education. ISSN 1751-2271

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/mbe.12219

Abstract

Initial Teacher Education (ITE) offers an underutilised opportunity for bridging the gap between neuroscience research and educational practice. This article reports on innovations embedded within an ITE programme to support trainee teachers to recognise and challenge the persistence of neuromyths. Education researchers, neuroscientists and psychologists collaboratively applied design-based research to create, improve and reflect on original neuroeducational teaching/learning resources for university-based primary (elementary) ITE trainees. Encouragingly, pre and post surveys showed reductions in trainees’ beliefs in neuromyths and a shift to responses showing uncertainty that suggested their beliefs became unsettled. The most persistent neuromyths were those regarding fish oils, left brain/right brain and learning styles/VAK. Trainees retained their initial interest in knowledge about the brain and education, gained confidence and became more critical about applying the Learning Sciences in educational contexts.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: neuromyth, initial teacher education, design-based research intervention
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
Divisions: Institute for Education
Date Deposited: 13 Sep 2019 15:29
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2019 15:29
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