Adaptivity through self-directed learning to meet the challenges of our ever-changing world

Morris, T.H (2019) 'Adaptivity through self-directed learning to meet the challenges of our ever-changing world.' Adults Learning, 30 (2). pp. 56-66. ISSN 0955-2308

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1177/1045159518814486

Abstract

Fostering adult learners’ competence to adapt appropriately to our ever-changing world is a primary concern of adult education. The purpose of the present article is novel and examines whether the consideration of modes of learning (instruction, performance, and inquiry) could assist in the design of adult education that facilitates self-directed learning and enables learners to think and perform adaptively. The concept of modes of learning originated from the typology of Houle. However, to date, no study has reached beyond this typology, especially concerning the potential of using modes of learning in the design of adult education. Specifically, an apparent oversight in adult learning theory is the foremost importance of the consideration of whether inquiry is included in the learning process: its inclusion potentially differentiates the purpose of instruction, the nature of learners’ performance, and the underlying epistemological positioning. To redress this concern, two models of modes of learning are proposed and contrasted. The reinforcing model of modes of learning (instruction, performance, without inquiry) promotes teacher-directed learning. A key consequence of employing this model in adult education is that learners may become accustomed to habitually reinforcing patterns of perceiving, thinking, judging, feeling, and acting—performance that may be rather inflexible and represented by a distinct lack of a perceived need to adapt to social contextual changes: a lack of motivation for self-directed learning. Rather, the adapting model of modes of learning (instruction, performance, with inquiry) may facilitate learners to be adaptive in their performance—by encouraging an enhanced learner sensitivity toward changing social contextual conditions: potentially enhancing learners’ motivation for self-directed learning.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: self-directed learning, adult learning, modes of learning, model, education, instruction, inquiry, motivation, constructivism, adaptivity
Subjects: L Education > L Education (General)
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2361 Curriculum
L Education > LC Special aspects of education
L Education > LC Special aspects of education > LC5201 Education extension. Adult education. Continuing education
Divisions: School of Education
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1177/1045159518814486
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2020 13:01
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2020 16:33
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