Raman spectroscopy as a tool to determine the thermal maturity of organic matter: application to sedimentary, metamorphic and structural geology

Henry, D.G, Jarvis, I, Gillmore, G and Stephenson, M (2019) 'Raman spectroscopy as a tool to determine the thermal maturity of organic matter: application to sedimentary, metamorphic and structural geology.' Earth-Science Reviews, 198. e102936. ISSN 0012-8252

[img]
Preview
Text
14049.pdf - Published Version
CC BY-NC.ND 4.0.

Download (2MB) | Preview
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2019.102936

Abstract

Raman spectrometry is a rapid, non-destructive alternative to conventional tools employed to assess the thermal alteration of organic matter (OM). Raman may be used to determine vitrinite reflectance equivalent OM maturity values for petroleum exploration, to provide temperature data for metamorphic studies, and to determine the maximum temperatures reached in fault zones. To achieve the wider utilisation of Raman, the spectrum processing method, and the positions and nomenclature of Raman bands and parameters, all need to be standardized. We assess the most widely used Raman parameters as well as the best analytical practices that have been proposed. Raman band separation and G-band full-width at half-maximum are the best parameters to estimate the maturity for rocks following diagenesis–metagenesis. For metamorphic studies, the ratios of band areas after performing deconvolution are generally used. Further work is needed on the second-order region, as well as assessing the potential of using integrated areas on the whole spectrum, to increase the calibrated temperature range of Raman parameters. Applying Raman spectroscopy on faults has potential to be able to infer both temperature and deformation processes. We propose a unified terminology for OM Raman bands and parameters that should be adopted in the future. The popular method of fitting several functions to a spectrum is generally unnecessary, as Raman parameters determined from an un-deconvoluted spectrum can track the maturity of OM. To progress the Raman application as a geothermometer a standardized approach must be developed and tested by means of an interlaboratory calibration exercise using reference materials.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: School of Sciences
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2019.102936
Date Deposited: 27 May 2021 18:38
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2021 09:56
Request a change to this item or report an issue Request a change to this item or report an issue
Update item (repository staff only) Update item (repository staff only)