Wellbeing and coping of UK nurses, midwives and allied health professionals during COVID-19 - a cross-sectional study

Gillen, P, Neill, R.D, Mallett, J, Moriarty, J, Manthorpe, J, Schroder, H, Currie, D, McGrory, S, Nicholl, P, Ravalier, J.M and McFadden, P (2022) 'Wellbeing and coping of UK nurses, midwives and allied health professionals during COVID-19 - a cross-sectional study.' PLoS ONE, 17 (9). e0274036. ISSN 1932-6203

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0274036

Abstract

Nurse, Midwives and Allied Health Professionals (AHPs), along with other health and social care colleagues are the backbone of healthcare services. They have played a key role in responding to the increased demands on healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper compares cross-sectional data on quality of working life, wellbeing, coping and burnout of nurses, midwives and AHPs in the United Kingdom (UK) at two time points during the COVID-19 pandemic. An anonymous online repeated cross-sectional survey was conducted at two timepoints, Phase 1 (7th May 2020-3rd July 2020); Phase 2 (17th November 2020-1st February 2021). The survey consisted of the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale, the Work-Related Quality of Life Scale, and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (Phase 2 only) to measure wellbeing, quality of working life and burnout. The Brief COPE scale and Strategies for Coping with Work and Family Stressors scale assessed coping strategies. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regressions examined the effects of coping strategies and demographic and work-related variables on wellbeing and quality of working life. A total of 1839 nurses, midwives and AHPs responded to the first or second survey, with a final sample of 1410 respondents -586 from Phase 1; 824 from Phase 2, (422 nurses, 192 midwives and 796 AHPs). Wellbeing and quality of working life scores were significantly lower in the Phase 2 sample compared to respondents in Phase 1 (p<0.001). The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant effect on psychological wellbeing and quality of working life which decreased while the use of negative coping and burnout of these healthcare professionals increased. Health services are now trying to respond to the needs of patients with COVID-19 variants while rebuilding services and tackling the backlog of normal care provision. This workforce would benefit from additional support/services to prevent further deterioration in mental health and wellbeing and optimise workforce retention.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: School of Sciences
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0274036
Date Deposited: 26 Sep 2022 15:24
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2022 15:24
URI / Page ID: https://researchspace.bathspa.ac.uk/id/eprint/14995
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