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Comparison of methods of extraction of antioxidant compounds from the peel from Mango (Manguifera indica L.)

Del Rio, A and Marshall, R (2014) Comparison of methods of extraction of antioxidant compounds from the peel from Mango (Manguifera indica L.). In: 3rd International ISEKI Food Conference: Bridging Training and Research for Industry and the Wider Community, 21 - 23 May 2014, Athens, Greece.

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Abstract

There is considerable interest in characterising the antioxidant properties of many foods. Mango, (Mangifera indica L.) is a sub-tropical fruit of commercial importance. However, the skins are not normally eaten allthough they may contain nutritionally useful ingredients. We compared the efficiency of three different methods for extracting antioxidant compounds: methanol-acetone (MA), methanol-water (MW) and water (W) as solvents, for the extraction of phenolic compounds with antioxidant activity. The total phenolic content and the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of the different extracts was measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method. At the same time the influence of the pre-treatment drying methods freeze drying (F) and oven drying (O), were evaluated. The TAC of the extracts ranged from 4,539.0 to 11938.4 μM of Trolox equivalent (TE) per g of dry weight (DW), with the aqueous method (W) significantly the most effective. However, there was no statistical difference in the total phenolic content of the extracts. None of the drying methods had any significant effect on the total antioxidant capacity and the total phenolic content. The efficiency and simplicity of the aqueous extraction make it zan excellent method for the extraction of hydrophilic antioxidant compounds with important bioactive properties.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Additional Information:

This research was carried out in the School of Human Sciences, London Metropolitan University, London. Richard Marshall was the corresponding author for this poster.

Divisions: College of Liberal Arts
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Date Deposited: 26 Nov 2014 17:03
Last Modified: 29 Apr 2016 14:11
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