Coast, D (2017) ''Reformation’ or ‘ruin’? The impeachment of the duke of Buckingham and early Stuart politics.' Historical Research, 90 (250). pp. 704-725. ISSN 1468-2281

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-2281.12193

Abstract

This article challenges the influential revisionist interpretation of the impeachment of the duke of Buckingham in the parliament of 1626. It argues that Buckingham's enemies sought to remove him from power rather than ‘reform’ his errors or reach a compromise settlement whereby he would give up some offices. It explores the relationship between M.P.s and their patrons in the house of lords, the ideological and religious significance of the impeachment and the reasons for the dissolution, arguing that the attack on Buckingham was much more radical, polarizing and uncompromising than has previously been acknowledged.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Charles I; Buckingham; Parliament; Impeachment; 1620s
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General) > D204 Modern History
Divisions: College of Liberal Arts
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2016 17:05
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2017 19:33
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