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Evil in the early twentieth century: theological perspectives

Re Manning, R (2017) 'Evil in the early twentieth century: theological perspectives.' In: Harrison, V, ed. The history of evil in the early twentieth century. History of evil, V . Routledge, London. (Forthcoming)

Abstract

This chapter traces the central dynamics of Christian theological perspectives on evil in the early twentieth century. Using a later framework from Paul Ricoeur, the chapter distinguishes four “myths” of evil - the Christian theological “Adamic” and three alternatives: “chaos”, “tragedy” and “embodiment”. The chapter argues that the classical Augustinian perspective on evil that the twentieth century inherits contains three basic points of tension, regarding sin, privation and theodicy. It further argues that resurgences of the alternative myths of evil put further pressures on the classical Christian account of evil, leading to the development of significant new theological perspectives that seek to integrate the insights of the alternative myths of evil into the Adamic account. The chapter briefly considers in this framework the proposals of three theological giants of the period, Karl Rahner, Paul Tillich and Karl Barth.

Item Type: Book Chapter or Section
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BL Religion
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BR Christianity
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BT Doctrinal Theology
Divisions: College of Liberal Arts
Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2016 14:05
Last Modified: 05 Aug 2016 14:58
URI: http://researchspace.bathspa.ac.uk/id/eprint/7427
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