Newsinger, J (2016) 'Why Rhodes must fall.' Race & Class, 58 (2). pp. 70-78. ISSN 0306-3968

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0306396816657726

Abstract

The international Rhodes Must Fall campaign has reinvigorated public interest in the legacy of Cecil Rhodes, Empire and the production of historical memory. But it has also been subject to a fierce backlash in the rightwing media, which has fought against the campaign at an Oxford college to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes both on the grounds of free speech (and the right to offend) and on the grounds that Rhodes must be judged by the standards of his time. Here, the author revisits Rhodes’ legacy in Africa, detailing not only his imperial exploits via the British South Africa Company but the way he was reviled by British politicians, thinkers, and writers at the time – even at Oxford itself.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: British Empire, British South African Company, Cecil Rhodes, Chris Patten, free speech, Oriel College, Rhodes Must Fall, Rhodes Scholarship
Divisions: College of Liberal Arts
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2016 16:57
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2017 08:40
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